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Full Prescribing Information including Boxed WARNING »

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Enoxaparin Sodium Injection is an anticoagulant, also known as a blood thinner, that slows the body’s normal clotting process—reducing your risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Since you may still be at risk for developing DVT blood clots even after leaving the hospital, continuing enoxaparin treatment at home is an important step in reducing your risk of developing DVT blood clots. This website provides instructions on how to administer Enoxaparin Sodium Injection at home.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

If you are receiving epidural or spinal anesthesia or undergoing spinal puncture, and taking Enoxaparin Sodium Injection, you may be at increased risk of developing a blood clot in or around the spine, which can result in long-term paralysis. Your risk may be further increased if you:

  • Take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), platelet inhibitors (such as aspirin), or other anticoagulants (blood thinners)
  • Have an indwelling epidural catheter
  • Have a history of spinal trauma, or repeated spinal anesthesia or punctures
  • Have a history of spinal deformities or spinal surgery

It is important to contact your doctor immediately if you experience symptoms such as tingling, numbness (especially in the lower limbs), or muscular weakness.

Please see additional Important Safety Information »

Please see full Prescribing Information including Boxed WARNING »

The information presented here does not take the place of injection instructions you may have received from your health care provider.

  • With this guide, you’ll learn how to properly administer enoxaparin on your own. Be sure to carefully walk through the guide with your doctor prior to your first self-injection.

    The information presented here does not take the place of injection instructions you may have received from your health care provider.

  • Step 1:

    Wash your hands with soap and warm water, and dry thoroughly.

    The information presented here does not take the place of injection instructions you may have received from your health care provider.

  • Step 2:

    Get into a comfortable position sitting or lying down.

    The information presented here does not take the place of injection instructions you may have received from your health care provider.

  • Step 3:

    Find a spot on the right or left side of your abdomen, at least two inches away from your belly button. Only inject enoxaparin in the abdominal area. Do not inject into a scar, bruise, or an area where clothing may rub.

    The information presented here does not take the place of injection instructions you may have received from your health care provider.

  • Step 4:

    Using an alcohol swab, clean the injection site, and let the area dry completely to avoid stinging.

    The information presented here does not take the place of injection instructions you may have received from your health care provider.

  • Step 5:

    Carefully remove the needle cap by grasping it and pulling it straight back from the syringe. To avoid bending the needle, do not twist the cap off. Once removed, set the needle cap aside for disposal.

    The information presented here does not take the place of injection instructions you may have received from your health care provider.

  • Step 6:

    Hold the syringe like a pencil. Avoid letting the needle touch anything after removing the needle cap. Be careful not to depress the plunger until ready to inject.

    The information presented here does not take the place of injection instructions you may have received from your health care provider.

  • Step 7:

    With your other hand, make a fold in the skin by pinching an inch of the cleaned area. Insert the full length of the needle straight into the fold at a 90 degree angle.

    The information presented here does not take the place of injection instructions you may have received from your health care provider.

  • Step 8:

    Press the plunger with your thumb until the syringe is completely empty. Hold onto the skin fold until the injection is complete to ensure the medicine enters the fatty tissue and not the muscle.

    The information presented here does not take the place of injection instructions you may have received from your health care provider.

  • Step 9:

    Pull the needle straight out, and let go of your skin. Do not try to recap the needle after injection. Do not rub the site after the injection; this could lead to bruising.

    The information presented here does not take the place of injection instructions you may have received from your health care provider.

  • Step 10:

    Point the syringe away from you and those around you. Activate the safety shield by pushing down on the plunger until you hear a click.

    The information presented here does not take the place of injection instructions you may have received from your health care provider.

  • Step 11:

    Dispose of used syringe and needle cap into sharps disposal. Refer to local, state, and federal guidelines.

    The information presented here does not take the place of injection instructions you may have received from your health care provider.

Your Guide to Self-Injection

Indications & Usage+/-

Indications & Usage

Enoxaparin Sodium Injection is indicated for the prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which may lead to pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients:

  • Undergoing abdominal surgery who are at risk of thromboembolic complications
  • Undergoing hip-replacement surgery, during and following hospitalization
  • Undergoing knee-replacement surgery
  • At risk for thromboembolic complications due to severely restricted mobility during acute illness

Enoxaparin Sodium Injection is indicated for treatment of acute DVT:

  • The INPATIENT TREATMENT of acute DVT, with or without PE, when administered in conjunction with warfarin sodium
  • The OUTPATIENT TREATMENT of acute DVT, without PE, when administered in conjunction with warfarin sodium

Enoxaparin Sodium Injection is indicated for the prophylaxis of ischemic complications of unstable angina and non-Q-wave myocardial infarction, when concurrently administered with aspirin.

Enoxaparin Sodium Injection, when administered concurrently with aspirin, has been shown to reduce the rate of the combined endpoint of recurrent myocardial infarction or death in patients with acute STEMI receiving thrombolysis and being managed medically or with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

The information presented here does not take the place of injection instructions you may have received from your health care provider.

Please see full Prescribing Information including Boxed WARNING »

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION+/-

Important Safety Information

If you are receiving epidural or spinal anesthesia or undergoing spinal puncture, and taking Enoxaparin Sodium Injection, you may be at increased risk of developing a blood clot in or around the spine, which can result in long-term paralysis. Your risk may be further increased if you:

  • Take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), platelet inhibitors (such as aspirin), or other anticoagulants (blood thinners)
  • Have an indwelling epidural catheter
  • Have a history of spinal trauma, or repeated spinal anesthesia or punctures
  • Have a history of spinal deformities or spinal surgery

It is important to contact your doctor immediately if you experience symptoms such as tingling, numbness (especially in the lower limbs), or muscular weakness.

You should not use Enoxaparin Sodium Injection if you are actively bleeding or have a low count of platelets, blood cells that aid in clotting. This is a condition called thrombocytopenia. Enoxaparin Sodium Injection should also not be used in patients who are allergic or sensitive to enoxaparin, heparin, or pork products.

You should use enoxaparin with care and be closely monitored by your doctor if you have any of the following:

  • Excessive bleeding
  • Problems with clotting
  • Impaired vision due to diabetes
  • Kidney problems
  • A recent ulcer
  • Uncontrolled high blood pressure
  • Mechanical prosthetic heart valves and are pregnant because you may be at higher risk for blood clots

Some patients on Enoxaparin Sodium Injection can experience drops in their platelet counts, a condition called thrombocytopenia. Also, a serious but rare condition called “heparin-induced thrombocytopenia” can occur. You must promptly notify your health care professional if you have had these conditions.

Enoxaparin Sodium Injection alters the blood’s ability to clot. Excessive bleeding (hemorrhage), leading to death, has occurred with Enoxaparin Sodium Injection. Bleeding can occur at any site with Enoxaparin Sodium Injection use.

The use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), like ibuprofen or naproxen, while using enoxaparin may enhance the risk of excessive bleeding. Be sure to tell your doctor and dentist about all of the medications you are taking, including over-the-counter, herbal, and homeopathic medications. Also be sure to tell your doctor and dentist that you are taking Enoxaparin Sodium Injection before any surgery is scheduled and before any new drug is taken.

All patients should be carefully monitored by their doctor while taking Enoxaparin Sodium Injection. The doctor will obtain blood tests that measure your blood count and check for signs of hidden bleeding while you are on enoxaparin.

You should call your doctor immediately if you notice any of the following: unusual bleeding or bleeding that lasts a long time, unusual bruising, signs of thrombocytopenia (such as a rash or dark spots under the skin), tingling or numbness (especially in the lower limbs), or muscular weakness.

Most common side effects from the use of Enoxaparin Sodium Injection include:

  • Mild pain, irritation, bruising, or redness of the skin at the injection site
  • Anemia
  • Bleeding
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Ecchymosis
  • Fever
  • Edema
  • Peripheral Edema
  • Dyspnea
  • Confusion
  • Injection Site Pain

Do not stop taking Enoxaparin Sodium Injection without first talking to the doctor who prescribed it to you.

The information presented here does not take the place of injection instructions you may have received from your health care provider.

Please see full Prescribing Information including Boxed WARNING »

DOs AND DON'Ts+/-

The Dos and Don'ts of Continuing Treatment

  • DO alternate injection site with every injection
  • DO administer enoxaparin at the same time every day
  • DO look for unusual signs of bleeding
  • DO store enoxaparin at room temperature, away from light and moisture
  • DO use a new syringe if the safety shield is accidentally activated before use; safely store away the defective syringe and call your pharmacist for more information
  • DO tell your doctor about other medications you may be taking, including those that do not require a prescription
  • DON’T give enoxaparin to anyone other than the person it was prescribed for
  • DON’T take the following medications while taking enoxaparin, unless otherwise instructed by your doctor. They may increase your risk of bleeding:
    • - ASPIRIN OR ASPIRIN-CONTAINING PRODUCTS
    • - OTHER PLATELET INHIBITORS
    • - SALICYLATES (ASPIRIN-LIKE PRODUCTS)
    • - NONSTEROIDAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUGS (NSAIDS), SUCH AS IBUPROFEN, NAPROXEN, OR KETOROLAC
    • - COLD OR ALLERGY PRODUCTS, OR PAIN RELIEVERS THAT CONTAIN ANY OF THE ABOVE DRUGS

YOU SHOULD CALL YOUR HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONAL RIGHT AWAY IF YOU NOTICE ANY OF THE FOLLOWING:

  • Bleeding or oozing from surgical wound
  • Any other bleeding episodes; for example, bleeding at the site of the injection, nosebleeds, blood in your urine, or if you cough or vomit blood
  • Spontaneous bruising (a bruise not caused by a blow or any apparent reason)
  • Pain or swelling in any part of your leg, foot, or hip
  • Dizziness, numbness, or tingling
  • Rapid or unusual heartbeat
  • Chest pain or shortness of breath
  • Vomiting, nausea, or fever
  • Confusion

The information presented here does not take the place of injection instructions you may have received from your health care provider.

Please see full Prescribing Information including Boxed WARNING »

What is DVT?+/-

What is Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)?

DVT is a condition in which a blood clot, called thrombus, forms in one or more of the deep veins in the body, usually in the lower leg or thigh. Most often, a DVT blood clot occurs when blood flow is slowed following surgery, prolonged hospital stays, or extended bed rest due to injury or illness.

If a DVT blood clot breaks off and travels to the lungs, it can become lodged there, blocking blood flow and leading to a pulmonary embolism (PE), an extremely serious and potentially fatal condition.

What Increases Your Risk of DVT Blood Clots?

  • Advanced age
  • Birth control pills, pregnancy, and hormone replacement therapy (HRT)
  • Certain types of cancer and its treatment
  • Respiratory failure
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • Clotting disorders
  • Congestive heart failure (CHF)
  • Obesity
  • Prior DVT blood clot
  • Prolonged immobility
  • Surgery (abdominal surgery, knee- or hip-replacement surgery)

What Are the Warning Signs of Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) and Pulmonary Embolism (PE)?

As many as half of all DVT blood clots occur without any noticeable symptoms.

Call your doctor immediately if you experience any of the following warning signs of a DVT blood clot:

  • Swelling, discoloration, or redness in the leg
  • Pain or tenderness in the leg
  • Warmth over the leg

Call your doctor immediately if you experience any of the following warning signs of PE in your lung:

  • Chest pain
  • Rapid pulse (racing heartbeat)
  • Rapid breathing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Cough, with or without blood
  • Fatigue
  • Low-grade fever up to 101°F

How Can You Reduce Your Risk of Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)?

The choices you make in your day-to-day activities can go a long way toward reducing your risk of DVT.

  • Ask your doctor about blood-flow enhancing exercises
  • Check with your doctor before taking any new medications, vitamins, or supplements
  • Do not smoke
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Talk to your doctor about any changes in your health
  • Try to avoid extended periods of sitting—moving your feet or stretching your legs in a seated position can help

Before starting a new diet or exercise plan, be sure to talk to your doctor.

Important Safety Information for Enoxaparin Sodium Injection
The most common side effects from the use of Enoxaparin Sodium Injection are mild pain, irritation, bruising, or redness of the skin at the site of injection. Other common side effects include bleeding, anemia, diarrhea, nausea, ecchymosis, fever, edema, peripheral edema, dyspnea, confusion, and injection site pain. Please see additional Important Safety Information »

The information presented here does not take the place of injection instructions you may have received from your health care provider.

Please see full Prescribing Information including Boxed WARNING »

FAQs+/-

Frequently Asked Questions

Why do I need to continue Enoxaparin Sodium Injection treatment at home?
Because of your surgery or medical condition, there is a risk that DVT blood clots can develop after you leave the hospital. Your doctor has prescribed Enoxaparin Sodium Injection for continued therapy at home in order to help protect you against the risk of developing DVT blood clots.

Where should I store Enoxaparin Sodium Injection?
Be sure to store your prefilled syringes at room temperature of 20ºC to 25ºC (68ºF to 77ºF), away from light and moisture, and out of the reach of children.

May I inject Enoxaparin Sodium Injection anywhere other than the abdominal area?
No. Enoxaparin Sodium Injection should be injected into the fatty tissue only, which is why the abdomen is the recommended injection site. It is important not to inject Enoxaparin Sodium Injection into the muscle, as it can cause you to bruise, which can be uncomfortable.

How do I dispose of the used syringes?
Dispose of used syringe and needle cap into sharps disposal. Refer to local, state, and federal guidelines.

What should I do if the automatic safety device has already been activated?
Do not use the syringe—use a new one for your injection. Keep the defective syringe safely stored and contact your pharmacist for more information.

What should I do if there is an air bubble in the syringe?
Every syringe comes with a small air bubble. DO NOT expel the air bubble unless your doctor instructs you to adjust your dose. It’s safe to give yourself the injection, even with the air bubble.

What should I do if I think I have given myself too much Enoxaparin Sodium Injection?
Call your health care provider immediately, even if you don’t see or feel any unusual symptoms right away.

My doctor has prescribed less than a full syringe for me. What should I do?
Hold the syringe with the needle pointing down, but close enough so you can read the writing. Then expel the excess portion, and tap it off until the contents align with the dosage that your physician prescribed.

Who should I call if I have more questions about Enoxaparin Sodium Injection?
For specific questions about your Enoxaparin Sodium Injection treatment, consult your doctor or a qualified health care professional who is responsible for your care.

If you have questions regarding the Enoxaparin Sodium Injection Kit, please call Fresenius Kabi at (800) 551-7176.

How do I learn more about the risks of Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) blood clots and treatment with Enoxaparin Sodium Injection?
To find out more about what increases your risk for developing DVT blood clots and how Enoxaparin Sodium Injection anticoagulant therapy works to help reduce these risks, talk to your doctor.

Important Safety Information for Enoxaparin Sodium Injection
All patients should be carefully monitored by their doctor while taking Enoxaparin Sodium Injection. Your doctor is likely to obtain blood tests that measure your blood count and check for signs of hidden bleeding while you are on Enoxaparin Sodium Injection. Please see additional Important Safety Information »

The information presented here does not take the place of injection instructions you may have received from your health care provider.

Please see full Prescribing Information including Boxed WARNING »

If you have questions regarding the Enoxaparin Sodium Injection Kit, please call: (800) 551-7176 Available 8am to 5pm CST, Monday to Friday

Full Prescribing Information including Boxed WARNING »

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